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//Ep#97 How To Re-Write Your Past Part 2

Ep#97 How To Re-Write Your Past Part 2

We are continuing on how to re-write your past, and we are digging even deeper this time.  Kevin goes over a question and some feedback one of the listeners had about “how to re-write your past part 1”.  The listener just happened to ask a question in which Kevin has direct experience.  We will be going over Kevin’s past and he re-wrote the past in order to elevate his alpha.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What You’ll Learn From this Episode:

  • Understanding how to view your past in a neutral way
  • We go over how to change your past, going from neutrality into a positive story that drives your forward

Listen to the Full Episode:

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Speaker 2:

Welcome to the Alpha Male Coach Podcast. The only podcast that teaches men, the cognitive mastery and alpha mindset that it takes to become an influential and irresistible man of confidence. Here’s your host certified life coach, and international man of mystery, Kevin Aillaud.

Kevin Aillaud :

What’s up my brothers. Welcome back to the Alpha Male Coach Podcast. I am your host, Kevin Aillaud, and I’m actually going to do a part two today, but I’m not going to do the part two of direct experience. I know last week I did a direct experience podcast and told you as a two parter and that this week we would do part two, I’m actually going to put that episode and I’m going to move it back a week. We’re going to do that one next week, because two weeks ago, the podcast on how to rewrite your past came out. Remember that episode? How to rewrite your past. And that was such an amazing episode, that I had a response. I had a response from someone in the audience, and I want to address that response because I think it’s such a valuable comment that it’s worth everyone kind of listening to and kind of having this opening of this teaching.

Kevin Aillaud :

So what we’re going to do is we’re going to do a, how to rewrite your past part two today, and then we’re going to do the direct experience part two next week. So first of all, let’s go ahead, let me tell you what the response was. If you haven’t listened to how to rewrite your past part one, two weeks ago, then go ahead and go back and listen to that one, because there’s a part in that episode that is referenced in this comment. And the part in that episode, you’re going to want to listen to the whole thing, to really get the context of it all, to get the content and context. But essentially it was, I was giving example of how I rewrote a part of my past, a story that I told that was not serving me. That was not creating amazing relationships between me and my mother and me and just women in general, because of the relationship with my mom.

Kevin Aillaud :

And when I rewrote that story, this was the comment that our brother said to me. And I’m just going to read it word for word so you guys can hear it, and then later in the episode, I’ll go back and address parts of it so that we can really dive in and get into how to rewrite another story. So here’s the comment. “Okay, the story that you gave of the past is quite frankly, an easy one to rewrite. There is obviously truth in that the mother was doing what she could to care for her children. What about someone who was seriously abused as a child? For example, suppose he or she was physically beaten and emotionally abused. And let’s say that individual was physically abused so badly that it left scars, and I mean physical scars, which once the abuse was over, turned into daily and visible reminders of one’s terrible past. How would one rewrite that story in a positive light?”

Kevin Aillaud :

“Admittedly, this is an extreme case and it did not happen to me, but I use it to make a point. Some things that happen in someone’s past and how a person feels about it are not a result of how they’re thinking about it. Furthermore, they cannot be erased by just not thinking about them anymore or by creatively rethinking them. Some things were actually horrible, and there simply is no other way to think about them. I don’t intend to be dismissive of your theory about how one should treat the past. I believe that for most people, there’s much good that can come of it. But it only goes so far, I don’t believe it can be successfully applied in all situations.” That’s the end of the comment. And I love this comment,

brothers. I just love how this is written. There’s so many things in here that are so amazing, and I want to kind of address them one by one.

Kevin Aillaud :

But first of all, I want to say that I love you. I love this person that wrote this and sent me this email. I love you because you had a reaction. You listened to the podcast, it resonated with you in some way, and you took action. You took an action to reach out and start asking questions to dig more deeply, to be more curious. Yes, there were a lot of statements in there. Yes, there were a lot of your beliefs that you’re stating as facts, but there’s questions in there. And I want to get to those questions. And I just love you so much for your courage and your curiosity, and for you to really open up this opportunity for me to teach and rewrite another story, the story that you have presented. I know you said it didn’t happen to you, but it’s a story that you presented and it’s a story that I want to help you rewrite.

Kevin Aillaud :

Second of all, I do want to say that you can think and believe anything you want. And this is something I teach all my students. Everyone out there, all of you listeners out there you can think and believe anything you want. I am not telling anyone that they should believe what I believe or have to believe what I believe. My beliefs don’t require that all of you believe the same thing. I am simply offering a way, I’m offering a truth. I’m offering a methodology on how you can think about your thinking so that you feel better in the moment and drive the actions that serve your in the future. The past is dead and gone. I am concerned about what is happening now. Not the events that occurred a week ago, a month ago, a year ago or a decade ago, but just what is happening right now in this moment, which are determined by your thoughts always.

Kevin Aillaud :

I am also mindful of the future and creating with intention. So my brothers, every single one of you out there, every single one of you listening right now. If believing you had a terrible childhood or past, if believing that horrible things happen to you, if believing that things happened to you that shouldn’t have or things that didn’t happen to you, but should have, if believing all of that serves your present life and helps you create with intention, the life that you desire in your future, that I’m not going to stand in your way. And I’m not going to tell you, “No, you must think differently about your past. You must rewrite your past. You must pass through neutral and think positively about your past.” You are a human adult. You’re an adult human, and you can think anything you want. Your mental space is your own.

Kevin Aillaud :

That is your domain. My offering is for you and all my students to observe what results that you are creating with your beliefs, and if you continue to want those results. If you do continue to want those results, change nothing. If you don’t want the same results and you have results you want to create with intention, then I can help guide you to change your cognition to drive those desired results. Now, having all said that, let’s examine the proposed story. And I’m going to go back through it a little bit, just the first part. So again, our brother has sent me this email. He says, “Okay, the story you gave of the past is quite frankly, an easy one to rewrite. There’s obvious truth in the mother was doing what she could to care for her children. What about someone who was seriously abused as a child?”

Kevin Aillaud :

Question mark. Boom. There’s the question, mark. And then he gives an example, “For example, suppose he or she was physically beaten and emotionally abused. And let’s say that individual was physically abused so badly that it left scars. And I mean physical scars, which, once the abuse was over, turned into daily invisible reminders of one’s terrible past. How would one rewrite that story in a positive light?” Question mark, boom. I’m going to answer that. Now, our brother also says, this is an extreme case and it did not happen to me. So I get that. I understand that. Now ironically, that did happen to me. I think it’s very fascinating that you sent that email. I think it’s very fascinating that I received that email, I should say. I received this email and is a story that I have rewritten. This is a story that has happened in my life.

Kevin Aillaud :

I have not been completely candid about my childhood with all of you. With all the drama and the story that I used to tell myself, I’ve kind of skipped over or passed through, or maybe even just have rewritten so much of it, that I’m not really thinking about it, talking about it, it’s not a part of my identity. You can go back and listen to episode one. If you choose to. If you choose to go back and listen to that, I’ve given you guys a little bit. But I’m going to go deeper and just tell you that. Yeah, look, I was abused physically, emotionally, of course. I’ve told you guys about that. But I was abused very physically and yes, it was so consistent and violent that I’ve been left with scars, physical scars into my adulthood. Even as a 40 year old man today, I can see these scars when I look in the mirror, I can see the scars on my body.

Kevin Aillaud :

Some of them I can’t see because they’re in places of my body that I can’t see. But I have physical scars from that time in my life, from both direct and indirect abuse. I have burns on my body from cigarettes, from cigars, from just being burned. I have scars on my face from being struck, from being hit with not just a fist brother, but with bats, chains, belts, I have scars on my face. I have scars from indirect abuse. For example, I was riding my bike with my stepdad. He kicked me off the bike. I tumbled down a hillside. And on my way down, I was impaled by multiple sharp sticks in the ground, and these required stitches.

Kevin Aillaud :

And I still have these scars left over. I’ve had bones broken by this man. I almost lost a finger from this abuse. Because there was one point my stepdad, he had grabbed my arm and he was slamming my forum in the bathroom door, in the door of the bathroom, and I was struggling so hard to pull away that I pulled away, slipped his grip and the door caught my finger and it almost severed my finger off. And we had to go to the hospital to get it re-stitched back on, and I have the scars on my finger just to show where it was almost completely severed off. This is just a few of the events in my childhood that left scars on my body, into my adulthood. And I have more that I can share with you, but we don’t have the time in this podcast.

Kevin Aillaud :

Really, what I want to do is I want to help you see that you presented me with a story of my life, that now I have the opportunity to go and share how I was able to rewrite this story, to empower myself and really bring it to all of you here in my audience, all of you that are listening. Now, the first thing I want to do is go back to the email and just kind of finish it up because we got halfway through the email. I will come back and I will rewrite this story of my past and this hypothetical story of our brother, but this quite literal story of my past. But first I want to go, and I want to respond to the rest of his email because he deserves that. Our brother who said this, he deserves me to respond to the rest of this,

because he says, some things that happen in someone’s past and how a person feels about it are not a result of how they’re thinking about it.

Kevin Aillaud :

That’s actually not true. The truth is that we do not feel feelings from our past. We feel feelings from our thoughts. And when we’re thinking about the past, even though it’s the past, that is the thought, it’s the moment that we’re having those emotions. So we can think about the same events that occurred in our past in a different way, and have a different feeling about them in that moment. The feeling that we’re having now comes from the thoughts we’re having now. They don’t come from the thoughts we were having then, or the feelings that we were having then. That’s simply neuroscience, my friend. I would love to spend more time on that, but that’s not the scope of this podcast. Our emotions are chemical messengers that come from our brain that indicate what we’re thinking and what we’re believing.

Kevin Aillaud :

It doesn’t come from the past. It doesn’t come from previous events. So going back now to the email, it says, “Furthermore, they cannot be erased by just not thinking about them anymore, or by creatively rethinking them.” And you know what, you’re absolutely right. I am not teaching that we erase our thoughts or our past. I’m not talking about erasing our past. I’m not talking about erasing our memories. I’m talking about rewriting them, reframing them. Thinking about them in a different way so that you feel different now in the moment with who you are today, with the person you’ve become, rather than thinking about them as the person that you were experiencing them in that moment. It’s not erasing, it’s not rephrasing anything. We’re not going back and changing, in fact, that’s the opposite. I do not teach that we change things because we cannot change things. The past is the past. It’s dead, it’s gone, it’s unchangeable. It’s not the erasing or the changing, it’s the reframing of the thoughts to align with who we are versus who we were.

Kevin Aillaud :

Then our brother goes on. He says, “Some things were actually horrible and there’s simply no other way to think about them.” And again, that’s okay. You can believe that, 100%. That’s yours to believe. I believe in the universal truth. I believe that there’s nothing actually horrible. There’s nothing actually outside of us that’s horrible, it’s all what we decide to make it mean. And I’m going to actually show you that by how I changed what I made my past mean, where I used to think it was horrible, but not anymore. And then he goes on and says, “I don’t intend to be dismissive of your theory and how one should treat the past. I believe that for most people there’s much good that become of it, but it only goes so far. I don’t believe it can be successfully applied all the time.” 100% brother, that is totally yours to have.

Kevin Aillaud :

If that is the beliefs that you want to have, then that is the results that you will create for yourself. And I want to rewrite this story, I want to show you how this works. Because as I do this, I’m going to say again, that you don’t have to rewrite or leave behind any part of your past that you don’t want to. If you choose to believe that your past was terrible and horrible, any of you out there, and that it defines you to this day as having something wrong, to have something gone wrong and you shouldn’t be where you are now, and you should be more successful, you should be more loved, or you should be more worried or worthy or whatever, if it hadn’t happened, what happened to you, then that’s for you. That’s a choice that you can make.

Kevin Aillaud :

It’s neither a right choice, nor a wrong choice, brother. It’s simply a choice that you make for yourself and how you want to experience your life today. If you want to experience your life as you did then, you can think about the same thoughts, have the same emotions around it. But let’s be clear and honest, it’s a choice. You’re making this choice, either consciously or unconsciously, because all subjectivity, all thoughts are a choice. And believing all of that is your choice if you choose it, but you are not locked into it. None of that is a fact, which I’m going to show you right now by rewriting this past for you, hypothetically, as I did for myself, literally. So let’s rewrite this, okay, so here’s what happened. I’ve given you guys the background. I’ve given you a couple of stories.

Kevin Aillaud :

I was kicked off my bike. I had my finger slammed in a door. I was hit with all kinds of different objects. I had cell to cell contact. I had my stepdad hit me with his fist, with his foot, with his elbow, he would just strike my brother and I. So there was cellular to cellular contact, but there was also molecular to cellular contact. I was struck with belts and bats and bike chains and things like that. Now with these contacts, with this contact to my body, of course, I felt a lot of physical pain. At the time as a child, I felt a lot of physical pain, but I also felt a lot of emotional fear. I’m this little kid, I’m this little guy. I mean, this happened between the ages of seven to 12, I would even say six to 12, but it happened when I was a little kid.

Kevin Aillaud :

I was just in first grade. And I really didn’t have an idea on the way the world was. I had come from a situation where my mom and my biological father were very loud with each other, they would argue a lot. So I had an understanding of conflict, but I didn’t really understand actual fear, fear of pain, fear of violence, fear of not being safe. So here I was, this little guy, and I’ve got all of these things happening. Yes, there was the physical contact. The physical contact against my body, against the flesh of my body, my bones. Piercing my flesh breaking my bones, things like this.

Kevin Aillaud :

But it’s the emotion, It’s that emotion of feeling unsafe, it’s that emotion of feeling sort of scared and not knowing how long this is going to last, or if it’s going to be forever. And all of that emotion, all of that fear is what kept into my adulthood. So it was that fear of distrust, fear of other adults, fear of distrust of other adults. When it comes to attention. One of the needs that we have psychologically as human beings, the need for attention of others, the need for being attentive to others and having attention from others. For me as an adult, that became very dangerous. When I am receiving attention as a child, it’s in the form of violence, physical pain. So for me, when I became an adult and I would have people give me attention, any kind of attention, it was like, “I don’t want that. I don’t want your attention.”

Kevin Aillaud :

I became shy and introverted. I really wanted to stay away. I would hide, there was shame. And when people did give me attention, there was to be some sort of suspicion around it. So there were all of these things that kind of kept with me, affection and appreciation, acceptance for who I was, I wasn’t really able to grow in that. All of that kind of came with me into my adulthood. Now for me to rewrite this story, what I did was I began to understand that what happened, happened in a very direct experience way. Going back to last week’s podcast, and I’ve said it a couple of times already in this

episode, there was cellular to cellular contact. I was hit by another living organism. I was hit by another sort of this living thing, another human.

Kevin Aillaud :

There was molecular to cellular contact. I was struck by things and stuff. We think about when we stub our toe or when we bump into doors or walls, we’re stumbling around in the dark and we hit our shit shin on the coffee table. It’s like, “Oh, there’s that molecular to cellular pain.” You know what I mean? That’s what happened. That was my direct experience. And it came from this other human. It was what I made it mean in terms of my safety and my fear and my acceptance and my attention around adult human male forms in terms of the physical abuse. And I’ve already talked about female forms in terms of the abandonment and the neglect, and my mom should have been there to protect me and so on. So you can go back to a couple of episodes on that one.

Kevin Aillaud :

This one’s more about, yeah, I had that physical abuse. So passing through direct experience, let’s begin with the rewrite. Passing through direct experience, it’s kind of like, “Okay, so I had the contact, I had the physical contact.” If you remember last week, we talked about what direct experience is basically, there’s this bigger tree next to me. There’s this bigger tree that’s grown already. And I’m this little tree and I’m growing next to this big tree, but this bigger tree is so big that its branches are rubbing against me. There’s that tree to tree contact, or maybe this branches are falling on me. So I would get injured because of this indirect contact from this bigger tree. So my bark would chip off, I’d get these scars and I think about that contact, that tree to tree contact, that cellular to cellular contact that we as humans have when we contact, that’s what happened.

Kevin Aillaud :

Now, how does that little tree think about … well, not think about, but how does it experience? Because whether trees think or not, that’s a whole nother thought. But how does that tree experience that bigger tree? Does it experience as an attacker? Does it experience it as an abuser? Does it experience it’s rubbing of the bark as being these lifelong scars that are preventing it now from being the full tree that it can be? Or does it even just die? Does that tree just kind of roll over and decide, “Oh, I’ve lost this part of me or all of this rubbing is so much for me that I’m going to just stop driving my roots into the ground, stop receiving nutrients from my environment and stop growing into a bigger tree.”

Kevin Aillaud :

Do I just kind of turn over and become that dead tree? What is the experience for that tree? Now that tree just continues to grow. That tree does experiences this and continues to grow because it’s tree- ness, nothing has changed. It’s still a full tree. That little tree is still a tree, regardless of whether it’s had a little bit of bark rubbed off of it, or maybe it’s had a branch torn off because of something that happened with this bigger tree. It’s still going to be a tree in tree-ness, it’s still going to grow. It’s still way to be an amazing creation of what’s possible for that tree. Because that’s what it does, that’s what it is. The direct experience is simply that experience. That treat a tree contact or that cellular to cellular contact or that molecular to cellular contact. Whatever that happened to me there was simply energy colliding.

Kevin Aillaud :

And I know that that can sound really benign, that can sound really cold. It can sound really neutral. That’s the point, brother. All of you, that’s the point. The point of passing through neutral is understanding that it is benign. It is just there. It just happened. It happened as it happened and it couldn’t have happened any other way. And the reason why it couldn’t have happened any other way is because it didn’t, so because it happened that way, it happened for me. It was my journey, it’s always been my journey. My journey couldn’t be any other journey. Because if it would have been another journey, it would have been somebody else’s journey. It would have been your journey, or your journey, or your journey. It would have been one of your journeys, not my journey. Each one of your journeys is unique for you.

Kevin Aillaud :

So it is very neutral. It is very benign. And I could think of this journey as being off the track. I could think of it as being broken. I could think of it as being what shouldn’t have happened and be arguing with these events of my journey my entire life. I could stay in that place of argument. But I choose to rewrite that in a way that serves me. And the way that I rewrite that is in two ways. Number one, I look at where I am. And I say like, “This is the man that I am. This is the man that I’ve become. And this is so powerful. Look at what I’m able to do. Look at what I’m able to say. Look at the way I’m able to say it. Look at the way I’m able to explain to you guys to every one of you guys, what you know happened for me and my past. And the only reason that I’m able to connect with you guys is because of what happened for me in my past.”

Kevin Aillaud :

If it had not happened the way it happened, I would not be here on this podcast explaining these things in this way, having been there, done that and give you guys my experience to help you go through your experience. To help you understand better your experience. That happened for me, for you. And it continues to be like that. That’s the way life is. It’s that ripple effect of paying it forward. Now again, I can think that I’m broken and lost and damaged and wrong and that I should be somewhere else in my life, but that would also be a lie. That would be an illusion, because where I am is where I’m meant to be. Understand? And anywhere we’re meant to be is based on where we are from the choices that we’ve made.

Kevin Aillaud :

We are meant to be here because we’ve created it for ourselves. And I love being here. I love where I am and what I’m able to do, and I’m only able to do it because of my past, because of what I learned because of what I experienced and the way I experienced. And here’s the way I choose to write about my neutral past, my experience, my direct experience with the collision of cellular energy and molecular energy. Have you guys ever seen that movie Conan? Not the new one with the Aqua Man, I’m talking about the old one with Arnold Schwarzenegger. The old Conan. Now, if you haven’t seen that movie, I highly recommend it for two reasons, number one is the reason I’m about to tell you, it’s this amazing story. But two, the soundtrack is off the hook. I love it, it’s bananas.

Kevin Aillaud :

It’s probably one of the greatest soundtracks ever. If you think about scores, movie scores, check it out. It’s really amazing. But I want to tell you the story, because if you haven’t seen this movie, basically what happens is it opens up with Conan as a kid, as a child, maybe like 10, 12 years old. Which again, this is about the time in my life, it happened a little bit when I was younger, but about the time where sort of

my experience of resilience began. So the movie starts where he’s this kid and he’s really bonding with his dad. And he’s got this mom and everything’s great. And then he’s out there playing in the snow and this warring tribe comes in and basically just slaughters everybody. He sees his dad get eaten alive by dogs.

Kevin Aillaud :

His mom, he’s holding his mom’s hand, she’s the last one alive. And he’s holding her hand and she’s protecting and fighting and she’s got the sword up and she just gets her head chopped off. James Earl Jones character just chops her head off. So she literally dies while he’s holding her hand. And then they take this kid, this Conan, this boy, they put him in chains and they March him across the world. Over the mountains, through the desert, across the snow and everything. And they chain them to this wheel that apparently has no purpose, maybe it’s a mill for water for grain, but it seems to have no purpose. And they just have him walk. Chain him to this wheel and have him walk. And the rest of his child life he’s walking this wheel, and of course, it makes them strong, powerful.

Kevin Aillaud :

He becomes this Arnold Schwarzenegger character, but that’s not it. That’s not the end, because at the end, when he’s all adult and he’s grown up, then they take them off this wheel and they throw them into a pit. And they say, “Fight with this guy who’s trying to kill you. The person who doesn’t die is the winner.” And he learns to fight. He learns this survival. He learns what he’s capable of. He’s learned through all of these things that we would think is horrible. We would look at that and say, “Well, my gosh, his entire tribe was slaughtered. And then he had to walk himself halfway across the world. And then he had to basically just have this life of boredom and slavery and monotony where he’s just building his strength and muscle, but nothing else, there’s nothing going on.”

Kevin Aillaud :

“And then after all that, he’s got a fight to defend himself, basically to stay alive.” We would think that’s horrible. But in the end, what happens is, and this is within the first 20 minutes of the movie. In the end, what happens is he gets educated. They teach him how to use a sword. They teach them how to use weapons. They teach him philosophy and they teach him how to read and write. And he becomes this great warrior where Kings are now looking to him for advice. And he’s goes through all of this, and all of this is just a learning. It’s just a path for him to become this great, powerful figure and earn his freedom, so that now he can take all of that and step into the world as the man he’s become, who would not be the man that he had become had, not all of that happened to him.

Kevin Aillaud :

He would not be Conan the barbarian, this warrior, he’d be Conan, the kid who grew up in this tribe, in this village, with everything happening and everything was fun. So that’s the thing. And I think about that movie and I look at that movie, I’m like, yeah, that could be the end. That’s the end of the hero’s journey, but they go on and he takes revenge on whatever. He goes and he finds the James Earl Jones character. But I think about that, I think about, “Okay, so that’s how I rewrite my childhood.” That’s how I look at it. I look at the cellular to cellular contact that my stepdad made against my body. When he hit me in the face, when he struck me, when he was body to body. Or the molecular cellular contact, when there was an object of physical abuse, it was all just there to make me stronger.

Kevin Aillaud :

It was all just there to make my bones stronger, to help me deal with physical pain, to help me understand what physical pain is. To help me recognize that I can build myself strong. I got into fitness because of that. I got into fitness because I wanted to build a strong, resilient body. I knew what pain was. I had a good experience with it. I don’t say good as in positive, I mean, good like I had it pretty consistent. I had a fairly long duration of time, long duration of experience with it. And so I wanted to build up a strong body. That’s why I got into martial arts as well, because I wanted to be able to defend myself. I would not have done that, had I not had that experience. But I also had the experience of that emotional fear. And that is where I started to rewrite.

Kevin Aillaud :

I rewrote that to where yes, the fear was also there for me to know that what I could put up with what I could deal with. To create mental fortitude, to recognize that, yes, I can be afraid in this small child body of this giant adult who’s causing this physical pain for me. And now that I am a man who has built strength, who has built fortitude, who has built resolve and tenacity and resilience, I can now take all of that and re-assimilate it into my psyche, into the story that I tell myself about myself, not from a child’s perspective of fear, but from an adult’s perspective of capability. And what I love and what I want to end with, but what I love about our brother’s notes to me, this loving message that he said, which I love so much, because it allows me to share more of my story with you guys, is that he said, “What about the scars that are there?”

Kevin Aillaud :

“What about the scars that exists?” And it got me thinking about my scars. The truth is I don’t really think about them anymore because I don’t really think about them anymore. I don’t really see much of them anymore. I’m not looking at them and I’m not actively thinking about them. But it did me thinking about them in terms of, yeah, what if they are a symbol? I always thought of them as simple cells, it’s a cell. We have cells that create scar tissue, we have cells that create skin tissue. It’s the same, it’s still just a skin cell, it’s still just there. But what if I think of them not so neutrally, but as real, powerful reminders of what I know I can handle. Of what I know I’ve been through, and although, may not want to go through again. I may not necessarily want to put myself through that amount of physical pain as an adult, but knowing that I can. Knowing that I can handle it, that it’s not that big of a deal, that I can handle if physical pain, emotional pain, if it comes to me.

Kevin Aillaud :

I have built that resilience. I have built that resolve. I have built that fortitude. I do have that tenacity. I do have that mental strength, that physical strength, that spiritual healing power, I’ve got that. And these scars are my symbol. And I love you for that, brother. I love you for bringing that up and giving me the opportunity to think about my scars in that way, and be able to teach this lesson to all of our listeners who may have a story that is more intense for them than the stories that I share about myself. Because a story that I shared two weeks ago about my mom and about her having working two jobs, maybe that didn’t resonate with some of you. Maybe it resonated with some of you and you’re like, “Whoa, that’s really amazing. That’s awesome. I’m going to use that.”

Kevin Aillaud :

Maybe for others, it didn’t resonate. So I appreciate the opportunity to now be able to share with you another story of my past and how I was able to rewrite it in a way that serves me so much more than thinking that I was broken. Than thinking that I was a victim, than thinking that there was something

wrong with me and that I was never going to have a normal life. Thinking that I was never going to be able to live the way other people live with confidence and abundance and love.

Kevin Aillaud :

Because when I rewrote my story, I found that I had those things within me all the time. They’re always there. It’s not something that you receive from outside of you. It’s something that you open up within you. When you begin to look at the beliefs, the limiting beliefs, the thoughts that are preventing that energy from being and vibrating from its source, which is your alpha state. And that’s what I got for you guys today. I look forward to talking to you guys next week about more direct experience. We’re going to do part two on direct experience next week, and until then, elevate your alpha.

Speaker 2:

Thank you for listening to this episode, the Alpha Male Coach Podcast. If you enjoyed what you’ve heard and want even more, sign up for Unleash Your Alpha, your guide to shifting to the alpha mindset at thealphamalecoach.com/unleash.

By |2020-07-21T20:20:37-07:00July 21st, 2020|Podcast|0 Comments

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